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PTC's bottom line

BobP

New member
Part of the problem is that there are a lot of small engineering outfits out there that bought revision 20 and didn't take up the maitenance. If they now want to upgrade, PTC makes them pay the back maitenance as well as the cost of the latest software. They just cannot afford to do it so they stick with what theve got.
 

swcalvert

New member
I'm supprised when that happens. Not supprised that it DOES happen, just supprised that people spend that kind of money and don't get the maintenance.



Steve C
 

swcalvert

New member
I think you're right, Doug. I bet that's about the time SW started making big movements into PTC's market share.



Steve C
 

mgnt8

New member
...or they let their maintenance run out when their budgets and their ambition dried up after realizing it takes years of experience and training to effectively use and implement Pro/E. Is it any surprise they switched to solidworks - its cheaper to not use that package then Pro.
 

swcalvert

New member
I can't wait to see what happens when our bill for mainentance in the 2004 comes up. I bet someone above me will be screaming.



Steve C
 

nkpham

New member
I never even realized that Pro E was that old. I only recently heard about it when I started this package. For such an expensive package, I am surprised that they produce so many different versions. Knowing how long it takes to be comfortable with the program, I would not like to constantly upgrade. It would slow down progression if I had to renew my skills all the time.
 

mgnt8

New member
First of all,

The changes that come with a new revision are largely superficial (the functionality is the same but the User Interface has changed) and gradual (the windows-based UI was phased in over 3 years). Plus its a full time job just sorting through the videos, books, tutorials, seminars, etc. that teach Wildfire. If you really had to, I mean if the engineering department really counted on you , you would adjust to Wildfire in a few days.



Second of all,

The cost of maintenance is low compared with what it was. I negotiated ours down this year about 60%. If all you have is Foundation, you should not be paying much at all.



I just read an article in Cadalyst about how solidworks licenses make it easy to run it at home and on laptops because sw designers were too busy during the actual work day to get any design work done.

This is the secret to the solidworks business model: sell CAD to people who won't use it. No wonder PLM is so big, everybody is now a project manager.
 

dougr

New member
SW also offers free licenses - http://www.solidworks.com/pages/news/3DSkills.html - to out-of-work personages too - compare this to PTC's effort:



http://www.proecentral.com/portal/essentials/default.asp



Thought PTC's giveaway of 2001SE was a stroke, shame they never followed through and did the same with MisFire (yet ??)



Imagine being an employer and finding all these self trained, unemployed people - how would this influence you in deciding what software to buy ??



Imagine you were unemployed and they made you an offer like this ??



No matter the motive, an investment like this in the unemployed and students is an investment in everyone's future.



SolidWorks' management and marketing are definitely a lot more savvy than PTC's.
 

swcalvert

New member
I'm going to have to take some offense with mgnt8's statement about (the windows-based UI was phased in over 3 years). Unigraphics did it in one and it worked. And, are you saying it's over? WAS, is past tense, as fas I'm concerned, it ain't over yet. They still have some work to be done. I'm getting PTC Knowledge Base Notifications everyday about some problem with 'Wildfire and/or Intralink 3.3'



Steve C
 

Sidemout

New member
It sounds like mgnt8's comment about who SW sells CAD to is a slam... but it's really the truth. Especially for smaller companies, the line between an engineer and designer is getting very blurred. Many companies are hiring engineers to do the work of both. SW is at a huge advantage here. It is much easier to just sit down and intuitavely make parts in SW.



The issue of Pro/E having more functionality is a moot point. The response is So what, if one doesn't use that functionality, who cares?
 

swcalvert

New member
I guess that's what I'm trying to say. Functionality plays a greater part in the decision of which software to buy. And right now, Pro/E is harder to use, therefore, SW and UG are out selling it. Until Pro/E gets easier to learn and use, the bottom line will remain where it is today, at the bottom.



Steve C
 

dougr

New member
Point of order:



SolidWorks IS NOT EASIER TO USE.



They just make it sound like it is.



They just have savvier marketing and savvier people in general.
 

swcalvert

New member
You're right, Doug. I am not a SW user, I do know of people who either used it or are using it now and they have said that it is easier the use/learn than Pro/E.



Steve C
 

dougr

New member
Think SW was easier once - before my time - when it's fuctionality was pretty limited.



But Pro/E's got easier and SW more complicated.



Never thought I'd ever say this but intent manager is easier than SW sketcher.
 

swcalvert

New member
Well, I said this before and I'll say it again. Pro/E's sketcher is the easiest I have ever seen/used because it has to be - everything in Pro/E is based on it. You people that have never used a true features based CAD program are really missing something.



Steve C
 

dflockton

New member
dougr, you amaze me. I haven't been reading the forums for most of the summer so I guess I've missed your re-birth. Last I remember you held your fingers to form a cross at the mention of intent manager. Now you like it? It's nice to see but I gotta read more often or shocks like these could send me to an early grave.
 

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