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How to Apply Axial Torque Load?

HANSU

New member
Can someone help me how to apply axial torque in Pro mechanica?


The problem I am dealing with is to put constrains on one end of a drive shaft, but the other and of the shaft has a applied axial torque 25000Nm and is free to twist but not to be able to move radially or axially.


Can someone tell me how to apply axial torque in pro mechanica menu. The only selections I see are point,curve ,surface loadsor moments but no torque function specifically.


Thanks in advance.
 

altendky

New member
a moment is a torque. also, both ends should use a cylindrical
coordinate system for constraints. both ends will be free in all
three rotations. the constrained end should be restricted in r,z,
and theta. the torqued end only in r and z (not theta). to
create cylindrical coordinates, simply create the coordinate system
while in mechanica (rather than in pro/e). to apply the torque,
you will most likely need to create a shell on the surface you want to
load. hope this makes sense (and that i'm right...).



-kyle
 

HANSU

New member
Thanks.


Does anyone know how toapply total load at point for axial torque instead of using cylindrical coordinate system?


Now, I am very confused???
 

burnsp

New member
Hansu, try this...


  1. <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">Create a cylindrical coord system along the axis of the shaft. the 'z' axis should be the axis of the shaft<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /></LI>
    <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">Create a surface load using the top surface of the shaft and the cyl coord system. The distribution is Force Per Unit Area, Uniform. </LI>
    <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">Set your theta force value to some desired force and OK to complete. all other values should be zero </LI>
    <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">Now review the total load and check the actual torque (moment) applied to the shaft.</LI>

    1. <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level2 lfo1; tab-stops: list 1.0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">create a point at the center of the shaft end surface</LI>
      <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level2 lfo1; tab-stops: list 1.0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">pick Loads and then Rev Tot Loads</LI>
      <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level2 lfo1; tab-stops: list 1.0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">select the point and then the load, middle mouse button to complete</LI>
      <LI =Msonormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level2 lfo1; tab-stops: list 1.0in; mso-layout-grid-align: none">look at the resultant forces and moments - all should be zero except the moment about your shaft axis (usually
 

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