Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Hi everyone,

    I'm an Industrial Designer and I am contemplating making a career change and taking a job as a Solidworks Designer. Let me start off by saying I want to be purposely vague with
    my situation since I

  2. #2
    newhorizon,


    I can't help you on the payscale as the UK is different but I can give you some experience of industrial designers using SW. I previously worked in a design consultancy though I was primarily engineering based and worked with 2 industrial designers. They both learnt to use SW and used it to help in their designs. They both now run their own consultancies and are able to provide a full design service for their clients.


    Basically what I am saying is maybe you shouldn't look on this as a permanent career change but something to help your design skills and be able to offer a fuller package.


    As far as stability goes, I don't think anywhere is that stable at the minute worldwide. You take your chances wherever you are. One thing I would say is I loved working for a design consultancy due to varying range of products and the guys and girls I worked with. If I could go back to that tomorrow I would.....as long as it was owned by someone else.
    Michael

    ProE WF4 / Creo2 and SW 2010

  3. #3
    Hi,





    Thanks very much for this comment. It help me to think about
    my ideals.













    This link below can show more info, you can find them at:





    http://careerschange.net/












    Tks again and pls keep posting.



    Quote Originally Posted by michael3130

    newhorizon,


    I can't help you on the payscale as the UK is different but I can give you some experience of industrial designers using SW. I previously worked in a design consultancy though I was primarily engineering based and worked with 2 industrial designers. They both learnt to use SW and used it to help in their designs. They both now run their own consultancies and are able to provide a full design service for their clients.


    Basically what I am saying is maybe you shouldn't look on this as a permanent career change but something to help your design skills and be able to offer a fuller package.


    As far as stability goes, I don't think anywhere is that stable at the minute worldwide. You take your chances wherever you are. One thing I would say is I loved working for a design consultancy due to varying range of products and the guys and girls I worked with. If I could go back to that tomorrow I would.....as long as it was owned by someone else.
    Edited by: vegetablevn

  4. #4
    in the United States you could expect 25 to 45 per hour.More if contracting or consulting. Esp if you can use your ID visualization skills. In the US a designer typically means 'non degreed engineer' so be carfull how you present yourself.
    Bart Brejcha
    DESIGN-ENGINE|EDUCATION

    http://www.designengine.com/creo-training Creo Training

  5. #5
    I've only got an associates degree, but I've been doing
    industrial design in CAD (Solidworks and Pro-E mainly). I
    have 20 years experience, and have been stagnant salary-
    wise for the last few years. Ranges here in the midwest USA
    is $18-$20/hour for 2-5 years experience, probably topping
    at $28-$30/hour. not a bad living for this area. I know MEs
    that make about the same.

  6. #6
    I have a BFA in Industrial Design and have been working as a Mechanical Design Engineer for most of my career. I started my own company in 2007, and now earn between $35 to $65 an hour, depending on whether it's a contract job through a job shop or I get a job on my own. Things are very unstable, so don't count on finding the perfect job at a great salary that will last forever. I decided that I didn't want to count on any company or government for my sustenance, so I took the risk and stepped out on my own. It has been a hell of a ride for the last five years, with a few times of prosperity and a lot of time being just plain out of work and getting no response from anyone. However, I just paid off my house and am now within a few months of being completely out of debt, God willing. I spend a lot of time working from home and now have three projects going outside of my main contract job. It's always feast or famine. Most of the last five years were famine, but right now I'm feasting. You have to learn to manage your money and your spending, but nothing beats being completely independent. I learned to hate the corporate hand of control. I'd rather take the risk and deal with customers.
    KSauter

  7. #7
    With an Associates degree I suggest getting yourself up to speed with solidworks surfacing and call yourself a 'technical surface modeler' on your resume. That usually does the trick to get into a job interview in places like medical, toys and consumer incurables industries.
    Bart Brejcha
    DESIGN-ENGINE|EDUCATION

    http://www.designengine.com/creo-training Creo Training

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •